Dodd


Select Dodd Surname Genealogy

Here are some Dodd stories and accounts over the years:

Northumbrian Origins


Legend has it that the Dodds were descended from Eilaf, an Anglo-Saxon monk who was one of the carriers of St Cuthbert's coffin who fled from Lindisfarne at the time of the Viking raids in the 9th century.  It was said that Eilaf pinched some cheese from his fellow monks who prayed that that the culprit be revealed by turning him into a Dodd - a fox.  Prayers were answered and for a short while Eilaf was turned into a fox.  From that day on Eilaf and his descendents were known as Dodd.


Dodd and Dodds in 1891

County (000's)
Dodd
Dodds
Total
Northumberland
   0.8
   1.5
   2.3
Durham
   0.6
   2.1
   2.7
Yorkshire
   0.6
   0.5
   1.1
Lancashire
   2.0
   0.2
   2.2
Cheshire
   1.7
   0.1
   1.8
Staffordshire
   0.9
    -
   0.9
Elsewhere
   6.1
   0.6
   6.7
Total
  12.7
   5.0
  17.7


Dodd and Dodds Today

Dodd and Dodds are the main surname variants.  Dodd is more numerous today.

Numbers (000's)
Dodd
Dodds
Total
UK
   21  
   13  
   34  
America    
   10
    3
   13
Elsewhere         
   12
    7
   19
Total
   43
   23
   66


The Rev. John Dod of Shopwich


The Rev. John Dod was in his nineties when he suffered the following indignity: 

“During the Civil War, the Rev. John Dod dealt with the inhuman treatment of the King's party who proceeded to rob him of all his possessions except one sheet that he managed to sit on while the King's men looked for other loot.  He was near death at the time and took glory from having robbed the robbers."



John Dods of Jamestown

John Dods was among the original 104 settlers of Jamestown with Captain John Smith in 1607.   He was recorded there as a laborer, aged 18.

While at Jamestown he went to visit Powhatan at Werowocomoco and, during his visit, was said to have built a house for Powhatan.  This house is believed to have been of the same 'mud and stud' type of dwelling that has been found at Jamestown and was unique at that time to the area of east Lincolnshire in England. 

Dods survived the harsh early years and was recorded in the tax list of James City in 1623.  He was one of only three of the original settlers still alive at that time.  By that time he had married a local Indian woman. They were to have two children, Jesse and William Dodson, and possibly more.  The Dodsons of Virginia and West Virginia trace from this family.



Ralph Dodd and His Thames Projects

Ralph Dodd, a marine painter turned engineer, was the first in 1799 to promote a tunnel under the Thames. He had in fact two schemes, one to construct a tunnel linking Gravesend and Tilbury and the other to dig a six mile canal across the marshes to the river Medway. 

The canal project did proceed and by 1801 some four miles of the canal to Higham had been built.  However, Dodd soon departed the scene and it was not until 1824, some twenty three years later, that the canal was finally completed.  By
that time the Napoleonic Wars were long over and the military needs for the canal were no longer there. 

Work on the tunnel was started.  But lack of money and flooding meant that the project had to be abandoned.  The project was taken up again by Marc Isambard Brunel and his son in 1824.  It took eighteen years of struggle, using engineering techniques that were at the very limits of available technology at the time, before the tunnel was completed and opened.


Archibald Dodd of Cape Breton and His Family

In 1775 Archibald Charles Dodd had married in England a woman named Bridget, who, he later claimed, was a bigamist. She in turn stated that he had left her when her money was gone and that after she had refused his proposals for divorce they had agreed on his paying her an annual allowance.  These payments continued for many years.  However, in 1812 Bridget Dodd resurfaced, claiming that he had deserted her.  She persisted in her suit and even put together a petition in 1818, but nothing came of it. 

In 1787 Archibald had left England for Cape Breton in Canada.  One year later, he had married Susannah Gibbons, daughter of the Chief Justice of Cape Breton, and his political career there was underway.  Archibald and Susannah were to have eleven children. 


His oldest son, Edmund Murray Dodd, was Sydney township’s first elected representative and later served as a judge of the Supreme Court of Nova Scotia.  In turn, his son, Murray Dodd, became a Conservative MP for Sydney and also a judge.  Meanwhile, two of Archibald’s other sons, John and Phillip, became superintendants on Scatarie and Sable islands.  Allison Mitcham’s 1989 book Island Keepers told their story.




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