Hayes


Select Hayes Surname Genealogy

Here are some Hayes stories and accounts over the years:

The Hay Legend


The legendary origin of the Hays in Hector Boece’s fables harks back to the year 971 when Scotland was subjected to attack from Viking marauders.  King Kenneth II attempted to repel them, but his army was routed in an engagement at Luncarty north of Perth.  A farmer and his two sons, ploughing in a nearby field, had watched the proceedings.  These three men, all of huge physical stature, removed the yokes from their oxen and used them to bar the way of the fleeing Scots soldiery.  The peasant and his sons rallied the fleeing troops and led them back to victory, driving the Danes into the Firth of Tay. 

The king was delighted and insisted that the hero and his sons accompany him to Perth to receive suitable reward.  From the top of Kinnoull Hill, the king released a falcon, having decreed that all the land encompassed by the falcon’s flight would become the property of the hero and his sons.  The bird landed on a stone at St Madoes and the peasant became a rich man overnight. 

The salient features of these events were commemorated in the Hay coat of arms, which included three bloodstained shields, the falcon which became their crest, the ox yoke adopted as the badge of the family, and two peasants who were the supporters. 

It is a colorful and romantic tale.  However, it has little basis in fact.  The original Hays were in fact Normans, deriving their name from the barony of La Haye in Normandy.  The first of   these Hays was William II de la Haye who arrived in Scotland in the 12th century.



Hay, Hayes and Other Names in England and Scotland

Hay is Scottish, but does cross the border into northern England.  Hayes, Heys, and Hays are English, with a basis in Lancashire.  The following table shows their numbers in England and Scotland in the 1891 census.

Numbers (000's)
Hayes
Heyes
Heys
Hays
Hay
Total
England






Northumberland
   0.1 



   0.4
   0.5 
Durham
   0.3


   0.1
   0.4
   0.8
Yorkshire
   1.3
   0.1
   0.1
   0.2
   0.4
   2.1
Lancashire
   4.3
   2.5
   1.9
   0.1
   0.7
   9.5
Cheshire
   0.8



   0.1
   0.9
Notts.
   0.8




   0.8
London
   3.2


   0.1
   0.7
   4.0
Elsewhere
   6.8
   0.2
   0.2
   0.5
   1.5
   9.2
Total
  18.6
   2.8
   2.2
   1.0
   4.2
  28.8







Scotland
   0.3



   8.0
   8.3


Catherine Hayes, International Diva

Catherine Hayes was born in Limerick in 1825, the third daughter of Arthur and Mary Hayes.  Her father, a bandmaster of the Limerick city militia, deserted his family, causing great financial distress. 

The young Catherine helped her cousin Mrs. Carroll who worked as a charwoman at Lord Limerick's home. There she was heard singing as she worked by a Dr. Knox, a Church of Ireland Bishop who lived nearby.  He described her as having "the most beautiful voice I have ever heard."  He immediately set about helping her and arranged sponsorship for her to study under Antonio Sapio in Dublin. 

She gave her first public performance there in 1839 at the age of 19.  Seven years later Catherine Hayes was prima donna at La Scala in Milan and in 1849 she gave a Command Performance for Queen Victoria.  Sadly she died young, at the age of 36, in 1861.



Early Hays in Kentucky


Family tradition has it that William Hays and his family came from Rockbridge county in Virginia to eastern Kentucky in 1791 and were one of the first families to settle in that part of Kentucky.  William was the son of old John Hays of Virginia who had served in the Virginia Militia during the French and Indian Wars. 

A few years later, about 1795, William moved with his family to the Snowden Branch area of Breathitt county near the mouth of Quicksand Creek.  The old Hays cemetery at the top of Snowden Branch Hill has hundreds of Hays graves.  Most of them are only field stones for tombstones.  But it is almost certain that William and his family were buried beneath the ground here.  The tombstone of William’s grandson William, marked “Wm. CV Hase, died 1855,” can be seen there today.



Rutherford Hayes and Deaths in His Family

President Rutherford Hayes lived in an age when death, particularly at a young age, was far more common than it is today.  He himself was the posthumous son of Ruddy Hayes who had left his native Vermont to settle in Delaware, Ohio, only to die there of a local fever.  Of Sophia and Ruddy Hayes’ five offspring, only Rutherford and his older sister Fanny were to survive the vicissitudes of childhood. 

Rutherford’s wife Lucy suffered all of her life from severe headaches.  She died in 1889, just before her 58th birthday, from a massive apoplectic stroke – which was probably the result of undiagnosed high blood pressure.

Three of the Rutherford Hayes family of eight children died during the second summer of their lives.  Hayes sadly recorded in his diary the death of little Joseph from teething and dysentery in 1863, of George Crook from scarlet fever in 1866, and of Manning Force, eighth and last child, in 1874, from summer complaint.



The Troubled Times of William Hayes

William Hayes had been shipped to Australia on the Asiatic in 1843 as a twelve year old boy, having been tried in London for "stealing eight pairs of shoes" and sentenced to transportation for ten years.  He arrived in Hobart on September 23, 1843 and was sent to the Point Puer prison for boys. 

William’s record there was checkered.  In 1848 he was committed to trial for allegedly stabbing John Maddock with intent.  In the end he was found guilty of assault only, but sentenced to prison for three years in Hobart and given hard labor. 

William obtained his Ticket of Leave in 1852 and
married Catherine Lyons that year.  They had three daughters.  But it seems that Catherine left him as the girls were placed in an orphanage.  In 1861 William married Jane McClure in Hadspan, Tasmania and they had four children. 

However, three years later, William was charged with indecently assaulting one of his daughters from his marriage to Catherine Lyons and was sentenced to two years in jail.  While in prison he was found guilty of threatening to stab a fellow inmate and was sentenced to an additional three months in jail.  During that time his children by Jane McClure ended up in an orphanage. 

His prisoner discharge document stated his age as 41 yrs, his height as 5' 4" and his hair as dark.  He had the following distinguishing marks - anchor, crucifix and mermaid on his right arm and a mermaid on his left arm. 
Nothing further was known of William Hayes after his release.


Hayes Fishermen in Limerick

The Abbey fishermen consisted primarily of three Catholic families - Hayes, Clancy and McNamara – who lived in the Abbey area of Limerick city. 

They used a traditional fishing boat called the brecaun which was about twenty-four foot long and two and a half foot wide.  The boat was operated and used by two men, one at the fore and the other at aft.  It was steered over shallow water with the use of a pole.  A paddle was used on other occasions.  They caught the fish using a snap net. 

The fishermen generally had nicknames.  The following were the nicknames of the Hayes fishermen in the 1930’s, together with their date of birth.


Fisherman
Birth
Nickname
Thomas Hayes
1868
Hackney
Robert Hayes
1872
Napoleon
Martin Hayes
1874
Rab
John Hayes Sr.
1880
Bone
Patrick Hayes
1887
Sunlight
Michael Hayes
1891
Lully
Patrick Hayes
1894
Randy
Thomas Hayes
1903
Bantrum
Christy Hayes
1907
Susi or Sonny
Michael Hayes
1912
Starry
John Hayes Jr.
1912
O.K.




Return to Top of Page
Return to Hayes Main Page